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Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Opinion: Unwanted / Unneeded Marketing Ads / Let's Be the Change!



Unwanted and Unneeded Marketing Ads
Let’s Be the Change!

     I was born in the sixties, and grew up watching the Marlboro man cowboy, and the camel cigarette camel on the TV screen telling us that smoking would make us look like something different and feel like something different. 

     For that matter, this commercial: https://youtu.be/yQmpqvoEpws is from 1966 when I was only a year old. Come to where the flavor is. 


     Eventually, those type of TV commercials were banned and removed from TV ads, and now we see these instead: https://youtu.be/Y_56BQmY_e8  which tend to make people realize the cost of cancer, and tobacco together. 

     However, the thing is, we just keep going from bad to worse. For example, I just seen (and looked, but cannot find on the internet at this time.) a commercial for ‘Tequila Herradura.’ Now they have two commercials rolling, to which I could find neither. But the one I approve of whereas they are cutting down and chopping the agave azul plant, and then showing you how they chop it in half, and put it into some kind of cooker, and heat it up. That one, to me is educational. The other commercial, states, and I quote: “You don’t know me yet.” It’s a female drummer and some other people who would hope to become famous, in one way or another. The end is trying to put into your head that their brand of tequila can help you strive for success. 


     This is where I draw the line. Just like the Marlboro cowboy doesn’t make you sexy when you smoke, the tequila isn’t going to make you famous. Ads are misleading, especially the ads that are bad for you. 

     The weight loss commercials, they cannot guarantee you weight loss, the anti-wrinkle cream cannot get rid of those crow’s feet. And by all means, don’t listen to X-Files, because ‘The truth is not out there.’

     I am so sick of the ads and the lies, I feel like the television is nothing but a box trying to program us, it is no wonder people are keeping their children away from it now of days. Paid programming is just that: paid to program us, in more ways than one. 


     One of the things we as boob-tubers need to realize and do is simple. Mute the TV during the ads, take a bathroom break, get up and stretch your legs, and move around during the commercials. Stop being such couch potatoes, and letting the TV control you, instead, take control. You have the remote, tell it who the boss is. This way you can control your excessive eating habits, and snacking, and even move around a little bit more. Once you start doing, you will see a change. This is just the first step. Once you do this, (which is a small and simple step.) you can move onto the bigger things later. 

    It’s never too late to show those ads, that we don’t need them, and who is the boss! Help me out here! It’s time for a change! Do it with me, and share this article, and let’s be the change and get others to join us! We can do this! Who is with me?!


Resource:
http://www.herradura.com/#!/  Must be 21 to enter site.




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Corrections Class: Florida Prisons: Custody Levels & Punishments (Detailed)



Florida Prisons: Custody Levels and Punishments


State Prisons:
     Florida is a huge state, so we are divided into four regions. Therefore, we are going to go by the numbers of one, two three, and last but not least: four. 


     In region number one: the following facilities are included: Region 1 office, Apalachee-E CI, Apalachee-W CI, Bay CF, Blackwater River CF, Calhoun CI, Century CI, Franklin CI, Gadsen CF, Gadsen Re-Entry Center, Graceville CF, Gulf CI, Gulf CI -Annex, Holmes CI, Jackson CI, Jefferdon CI, Liberty CI, NWFRC, NWFRC Annex, Okaloosa CI, Quincy CI, Santa Rosa CI, Santa Rosa Annex, Wakulla CI, Wakulla CI Annex, and Walton CI. 

Region 2:
     Region 2 office, Baker CI, Baker Re-Entry Center, Columbia CI, Columbia Annex, Cross City CI, Cross City CI, Cross City East Unit, FL state Prison, FL State Prison – West, Hamilton CI, Hamilton Annex, Lake City CF, Lancaster CI, Lawtey CI, Madison CI, Mayo Annex, Putnam CI, RMC – Main, RMC – W, Suwannee CI, Suwannee Annex, Taylor CI, Taylor Annex, Tomoka CI, and Union CI. 

Region three:
     Region three office, Avon Park CI, CFRC -E, CFRC – Main, CFRC -S, Desoto Annex, Florida Women’s Reception Center, Hardee CI, Hernando CI, Lake CI, Lowell CI, Lowell Annex, Marion CI, Polk CI, Sumter CI, and Zephyrhills CI.

Region four:
     Region four office, Charlotte CI, Dade CI, Everglades CI, Homestead CI, Martin CI, Moore Haven CF, Okeechobee CI, South Bay CF, SFRC, and SFRC -S


     Inmate Population:          (All Prisons)                                            February 28, 2017
101-APALACHEE WEST UNIT







812
102-APALACHEE EAST UNIT







1,119
103-JEFFERSON C.I.







1,071
104-JACKSON C.I.







1,392
105-CALHOUN C.I.







1,383
106-CENTURY C.I.







1,363
107-HOLMES C.I.







1,228
108-WALTON C.I.







1,224
109-GULF C.I.







1,338
110-NWFRC MAIN UNIT.







1,052
111-GADSDEN C.F.







1,528
112-BAY C.F.







983
113-FRANKLIN C.I.







1,049
115-OKALOOSA C.I.







954
118-WAKULLA C.I.







1,274
119-SANTA ROSA C.I.







1,214
120-LIBERTY C.I.







1,200
122-WAKULLA ANNEX







1,128
124-FRANKLIN CI WORK CMP







412
125-NWFRC ANNEX.







1,168
127-SANTA ROSA WORK CMP







368
135-SANTA ROSA ANNEX







1,224
139-QUINCY ANNEX







397
142-LIBERTY SOUTH UNIT







428
144-GADSDEN RE-ENTRY CTR







410
150-GULF C.I.- ANNEX







1,295
159-GRACEVILLE C.F.







1,863
160-GRACEVILLE WORK CAMP







253
161-OKALOOSA WORK CAMP







253
162-HOLMES WORK CAMP







324
163-PANAMA CITY C.R.C.







67
164-PENSACOLA C.R.C.







82
165-CALHOUN WORK CAMP







281
166-JACKSON WORK CAMP







267
167-CENTURY WORK CAMP







274
168-TALLAHASSEE C.R.C







112
170-GULF FORESTRY CAMP







280
172-WALTON WORK CAMP







273
173-WAKULLA WORK CAMP







428
177-BERRYDALE FRSTRY CMP







-  
185-BLACKWATER C.F.







1,996
187-SHISA HOUSE WEST







           32
201-COLUMBIA C.I.







1,009
205-FLORIDA STATE PRISON







1,243
206-FSP WEST UNIT







793
208-R.M.C.- WEST UNIT







1,111
209-R.M.C.- MAIN UNIT







1,504
210-NEW RIVER CI







58
211-CROSS CITY C.I.







1,026
213-UNION C.I.







1,686
214-PUTNAM C.I.







456
215-HAMILTON C.I.







959
216-MADISON C.I.







1,297
218-TAYLOR C.I.







907
219-LAKE CITY C.F.







882
221-R.M.C WORK CAMP







426
223-MAYO C.I. ANNEX







1,120
224-TAYLOR ANNEX







1,139
227-TAYLOR WORK CAMP







378
230-SUWANNEE C.I







1,020
231-SUWANNEE C.I. ANNEX







1,193
232-SUWANNEE WORK CAMP







288
240-GAINESVILLE W.C.







260
250-HAMILTON ANNEX







1,313
251-COLUMBIA ANNEX







1,448
252-BRIDGES OF LAKE CITY







155
255-LAWTEY C.I.







802
256-TTH OF DINSMORE







116
261-BAKER WORK CAMP







282
262-CROSS CITY WORK CAMP







271
263-HAMILTON WORK CAMP







213
264-COLUMBIA WORK CAMP







279
265-MAYO WORK CAMP







311
267-BRIDGES OF JACKSONVI







138
268-UNION WORK CAMP







395
269-CROSS CITY EAST UNIT







405
271-BRIDGES OF SANTA FE







148
275-BAKER RE-ENTRY CENTER







409
278-SHISA HOUSE EAST







8
279-BAKER C.I.







1,159
280-LANCASTER W.C.







271
281-LANCASTER C.I.







498
282-TOMOKA C.I.







1,049
284-TOMOKA WORK CAMP







276
285-TOMOKA CRC-285







111
289-MADISON WORK CAMP







283
290-TOMOKA CRC-290







82
298-TOMOKA CRC-298







57
299-JACKSONVILLE BRIDGE







160
304-MARION C.I.







1,312
305-SUMTER ANNEX







43
307-SUMTER C.I.







1,162
308-SUMTER B.T.U.







28
312-LAKE C.I.







1,065
314-LOWELL C.I.







915
316-LOWELL WORK CAMP







279
320-CFRC-MAIN







1,474
321-CFRC-EAST







845
323-CFRC-SOUTH







98
336-HERNANDO C.I.







398
345-SUNCOAST C.R.C.(FEM)







159
347-BRIDGES OF COCOA







82
351-BRIDGES OF ORLANDO







142
352-ORLANDO BRIDGE







134
353-TTH OF KISSIMMEE







147
355-REENTRY CTR OF OCALA







100
361-ORLANDO C.R.C.







80
364-MARION WORK CAMP







278
365-SUMTER WORK CAMP







285
367-LOWELL ANNEX







1,252
368-FL.WOMENS RECPN.CTR







1,021
374-KISSIMMEE C.R.C.







154
381-TTH OF BARTOW







79
382-TTH OF TARPON SPRING







79
401-EVERGLADES C.I.







1,816
402-S.F.R.C.







761
403-S.F.R.C SOUTH UNIT







634
404-OKEECHOBEE C.I.







1,704
405-SOUTH BAY C.F.







1,939
407-OKEECHOBEE WORK CAMP







439
412-BRADENTON BRIDGE







118
419-HOMESTEAD C.I.







651
420-MARTIN WORK CAMP







257
426-BIG PINE KEY R.P.







45
430-MARTIN C.I.







1,409
431-LOXAHATCHEE R.P.







91
441-EVERGLADES RE-ENTRY







412
444-FORT PIERCE C.R.C.







83
446-HOLLYWOOD C.R.C.







148
452-ATLANTIC C.R.C.







45
457-MIAMI NORTH C.R.C.







185
463-DADE C.I.







1,477
464-SAGO PALM RE-ENTRY C







373
467-BRIDGES OF POMPANO







-  
469-W.PALM BEACH C.R.C.







147
470-TURNING POINT C.R.C







97
473-OPA LOCKA C.R.C.







148
501-HARDEE C.I.







1,329
503-AVON PARK C.I.







1,049
504-AVON PARK WORK CAMP







505
510-CHARLOTTE C.I.







1,249
511-MOORE HAVEN C.F.







984
525-ARCADIA ROAD PRISON







96
544-FT. MYERS WORK CAMP







117
552-LARGO R.P.







76
554-PINELLAS C.R.C.







44
560-DESOTO WORK CAMP







285
562-POLK WORK CAMP







267
563-HARDEE WORK CAMP







285
564-DESOTO ANNEX







1,460
573-ZEPHYRHILLS C.I.







667
580-POLK C.I.







1,123
583-ST. PETE C.R.C.







141
In–Transit







Total







97,468 


     Escapes from all prisons:
     “There were 10 escapes for the second quarter (October 2016 - December 2016) of Fiscal Year 2016-17. 8 (80.0%) of the escapes were from Contracted Work Release Centers and 2 (20.0%) were from Work Camps/Road Prisons. 3 of the 10 escapes (30.0%) were Level I escapes. 6 (60.0%) escapes were designated "not rated." There was 1 escape designated Level III during the second quarter. 

Of the 10 completed escapes, 9 (90.0%) were recaptured. Of the 9 recaptured, 8 (88.9%) were recaptured within the same quarter. Of those recaptured within the same quarter, 7 (87.5%) were recaptured within 24 hours of escape.

The overall escape rate for the quarter was 0.10 escapes per 1,000 inmates. This is slightly higher than the .08 rate observed for the second quarter of Fiscal Year 2015-16, but lower than the 0.2 rate observed for the second quarter of Fiscal Year 2014-15 as well as the 0.23 rate observed for the second quarter of Fiscal Year 2013-14. Region IV had the highest escape rate at 0.33. Region II had the lowest rate with 0.03 overall for the quarter.  

There was 1 attempted escape in the second quarter of Fiscal Year 2016-17.” Cited directly http://www.dc.state.fl.us/pub/escape/quarter/index.html

Furthermore, defining level 1, 2 and 3:
  • Level I: Escape from non-secure environment, such as a community correctional center or an outside work squad, in which no Level III behaviors are exhibited.
  • Level II: Escape from a secure perimeter or supervised environment in which no Level III behaviors are exhibited.
  • Level III: Escape that involves hostages, weapons/tools, outside assistance, or violence during or after the escape.
Death Row:


A Death Row cell is 6 x 9 x 9.5 feet high. Florida State Prison also has Death Watch cells to incarcerate inmates awaiting execution after the Governor signs a death warrant for them. A Death Watch cell is 12 x 7 x 8.5 feet high.

Men on Death Row are housed at Florida State Prison in Raiford, FL, and Union Correctional Institution in Raiford, FL. The women on Death Row are housed at Lowell Annex in Lowell, FL.





Death Row inmates are served meals three times a day: at 5:00 am, from 10:30 am to 11:00 am and from 4:00 pm to 4:30 pm. Food is prepared by prison staff and transported in insulated carts to the cells. Inmates are given sporks with their meals and they eat from the provided tray. Prior to execution, an inmate may request a last meal. To avoid extravagance, the food to prepare the last meal must cost no more than $40 and must be purchased locally.





All inmate visitors must be approved before any visitation can take place. Questions regarding an inmate's visiting day(s), visiting hours, and special visits should be directed to the Classification Officer responsible for the inmate at the inmate's assigned facility. Questions may be sent by letter, e-mail or by telephone. Members of the news media may request Death Row inmate interviews through the Department of Corrections Communications Office at (850) 488-0420. The inmate must agree to the interview and the interview will be non-contact.





The inmates may shower every other day.





Death Row inmates are counted at least once an hour. They are escorted in handcuffs and wear them everywhere except in their cells, the exercise yard and the shower. They are in their cells at all times except for medical reasons, exercise, social or legal visits or media interviews. When a death warrant is signed, the inmate is put under Death Watch status and is allowed a legal and social phone call.





Inmates may receive mail every day except holidays and weekends. They may have snacks, radios and thirteen inch televisions in their cells. They do not have cable television or air-conditioning and they are not allowed to be with each other in a common room. They can watch church services on closed circuit television. While on Death Watch, inmates may have radios and televisions positioned outside their cell bars.





Death Row inmates can be distinguished from other inmates by their orange t-shirts. Their pants are the same blue colored pants worn by regular inmates.




Security:
There are three levels of CM (CM I, CM II, CM III). CM I is the most restrictive cell housing level and CM III is the least restrictive. 

Close Management I: Restrictive single cell, single occupancy housing level.
    1. Inmates at this level have committed the most serious violations and are considered extreme security and management risks.
    2. An inmate assigned to CM I is not eligible for a work assignment inside or outside the CM unit.
    3. Privileges are the most restrictive at this close management level.
Close Management II: Restrictive cell housing--may be single or double occupancy.
    1. Inmates at this level have committed serious violations of policy and are considered extreme security and management risks.
    2. Inmates in CM II status are eligible for work assignments in CM I, CM II, death row housing units, and restricted labor squads.
    3. Inmates in this status are afforded more privileges and program opportunities than CM I inmates.
Close Management III: Restrictive double occupancy cell housing.
    1. This is the least restrictive of the three close management levels.
    2. CM III inmates are provided program opportunities outside of their cell housing as a transition phase preparing for their return to the general inmate population.
CM III inmates are eligible for consideration for an institutional work/program assignment outside of their cell housing.
  1. CM III inmates are eligible for work on the restricted labor squad, work inside CM units, or work usually designated for general population inmates.
  2. Work/program assignments and their individual type is based upon the inmate's behavior, CM level, and the need to provide a transition back into open population status.

How do we know where to put each prisoner?

     Our facilities incarcerate felons convicted and sentenced to more than a year. These inmates are transported from a county jail and enter our system through one of four male or two female reception centers strategically located throughout the state. Upon arrival at a reception center, an inmate is processed, tested, evaluated by health services, assessed for program needs, and his/her custody (security risks) determined. Custody is determined by reviewing the seriousness of their offenses, length of sentence, time remaining to serve, prior criminal record, escape history, prison adjustment, and other factors. The most serious offenders with the longest sentences and those least likely to adjust to institutional life are placed in more secure facilities. Based on the results of this process the inmate is then transferred to the appropriate facility.

Programs available:

    Anger Management classes, AA and NA, Church, Clergy, Pastoral Services, GED classes, Counseling, Off site work programs, (to those qualified and able) work release programs (to those qualified and able).

Florida Federal Prisons:

Coleman FCC, Marianna FCI, Miami FCI, Miami FDC, Orlando RRM, Pensacola FPC and Tallahassee FCI. 
The facilities in Coleman are as follows: USP Coleman II (high security) 1401 total inmates, Male offenders only, USP Coleman I (also high security) 1306 total inmates, also male, FCI Coleman Low (low security) 1921 male inmates, and FCI Coleman Medium with an adjacent satellite camp 1919 male and female offenders.

For Marianna it is as follows: They are a medium security federal prison with an adjacent minimum security satellite camp. 1399 total male and female inmates.

For Miami FCI: they are a low security federal prison with an adjacent minimum security satellite camp. 1335 male inmates. 

For Miami FDC: They are an administrative federal detention center.1306 male and female offenders.

For Miami RRM: This is a residential reentry management field office. (RRM) There are 13,629 total offenders managed by the RRM program. This list includes the following: 55 juveniles, 3663 home confinement, 699 jail/short term, 153 long term boarders, 9059 residential reentry centers.

Orlando RRM: This is another residential reentry management office. (RRM) There are 13,629 total offenders managed by the RRM program. This list includes the following: 55 juveniles, 3663 home confinement, 699 jail/short term, 153 long term boarders, 9059 residential reentry centers.

Pensacola FPC: this is a minimum security federal prison camp. 679 male inmates.

Tallahassee FCI: this is low facility federal correction center with a detention center. 849 male and female offenders.

Goals:

     In the federal systems, their goal is to see to it that the prisoner is able to reenter into civilization and not be a repeat offender. Their system is to rehabilitate them, reeducate them, and show them the right path. With this, they provide everything needed to do so. Such as schooling, church, AA, NA, and any kind of religious or counseling services the inmate may need to comfort them, and heal them to help them not to keep committing crimes in the future. 

Where and Why?

     The inmate is put into the federal prisons because of the severity of the crime, and then they are out into the location by which they live or caused the crime and were sentenced. 

      If you have never seen the inside of a penitentiary, it is best to go with someone you feel comfortable with the first time. If you are going to one with cells, let it be known that there will be oogling and ogling if you are a female, and to be prepared. Dress appropriately.




Resources:

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